Thursday, June 15, 2017

Dani Rodrik — Populism And The Economics Of Globalization

ABSTRACT

Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.
POPULISM AND THE ECONOMICS OF GLOBALIZATION
Dani Rodrik | Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University

2 comments:

Jonathan Larson said...

Populism first emerged in 1892. Populist is what members of the People's Party called themselves. And no, it did not come from nowhere.

Nice to know such a pig-ignorant man can make a living as an "intellectual."

Bob said...

A cloister is a wonderful thing.